LITHUANIA
GET MORE

There are many reasons to visit any place worth visiting.
There is nothing more precious than time. You cannot bring it back after it is wasted, while things that life destroys can be replaced.
In Lithuania, we offer you something that others cannot.

OTHER OFFER MORE JOY FOR YOUR DOLLAR,

WE OFFER SOMETHING ELSE..

Get more space. Get more fun. Get more pictures. Get more. More life for every minute you spend there.
In Lithuania you will get out of a long weekend than other people get out of two weeks on holiday somewhere else. Two weeks in Lithuania will pack your soul and the memory of your camera with more material than you can use in a year.
In Lithuania, we do not waste time on things that do not matter. Few other capital cities in the world (if any) can offer you 15 minutes transfer time from the airport to your downtown hotel.
After you check in, you can be having drinks in Town Hall square five minutes later. It will take you another thirty minutes and you are in a lakeside sauna, or watching sunset immersed in a lake surrounded by dense forests. This is how we do it. The same we are offering to you.
When you look at Lithuania on the map, you see this tiny blot. Many would believe it should be massively cramped and tight.
The truth is, over 65,300 square kilometres is home to just under three million people, making it one of the least densely populated countries in the world.
This is what we offer to all our visitors, who quickly come to realize this strange yet pleasing duality: the country is very compact which makes wasting time a thing of the past, and yet when you get where you want to get, you have the place all for yourself.
This is true everywhere: even in the Old Town of our capital, Vilnius, you can find empty streets in the middle of the day if you just walk a few hundred yards off the main tourist track.
Get out of town, and the feeling starts multiplying and expanding, like ripples in a lake. Lakeside country houses offer the incredible sensation of owning larger space around you than you ever experienced before in your life, real or imaginary.
Farm buildings, fields and meadows, little brooks just outside of an old sauna building, and this is all yours.

YOU’LL SWEAR YOU NEVER KNEW THERE CAN BE SO MANY STARS IN THE SKY.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

I SEE AMBER LIGHTS
WHENEVER YOU WALK BY

In Lithuania, amber is everywhere. In our towns and seaside resorts you will see countless shops, stalls, and just lone sellers peddling anything and everything made of amber in unbelievable quantities.
AMBER IS JUST A FOSSILIZED TREE RESIN, MUCH LIKE CHATEAUX PÉTRUS IS JUST A FERMENTED GRAPE JUICE.
In fact, it is much like wine because it has to come from a specific appellation (think Baltic Sea in this particular), because it has variable colors – from very light straw, like champagne (there is some milk or cream white, although you do not see this too often; cloudiness is not a fault of amber), to almost ruby red and cherry black, and because it has been processed by nature for a very, very long time. Longer than many of us can imagine.
Amber is not all that cheap, especially larger pieces – unlike wine, they are not making any more of it, so what came from the trees in the age of dinosaurs, is the last and finite supply. You would be advised to be a bit suspicious about especially large chunks: anything larger than a plum is extremely rare.
Looking for amber on the beach is the purest and rarest form of beachcombing, the sport of the kings, and it does wonders to your soul.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ANCIENT LAND.
HANDLE WITH CARE

 

LITHUANIA’S TROUBLED HISTORY BROUGHT A NUMBER OF POSITIVE EFFECTS.

Lithuania is a long-suffering land. Probably no other patch of land in Europe had some many foreign meddlers – and this resulted in fundamental, genetic mistrust of the government that you see when you talk to Lithuanians more intimately.
The country learned to be extremely, outstandingly, extraordinarily tolerant in the days when no-one ever heard of political correctness. People of different faiths were allowed to practice their religion and observe their customs with such methodical consistency that today’s Scandinavian levels of tolerance and respect simply look to us as reinvented habits that Lithuanians practiced centuries ago.
The 20th century and the World War II made a painful exception, wiping out almost the entire Jewish population, but the tradition of tolerance and a diverse society lives on.
You will find that, much like the sense of humour for the English, the sense of the past for Lithuanians is never a thing with its delineated territory but very much a continuing thread of our everyday lives. The best part is we show it all willingly to you.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

HEAVY DUTY:
THE LAND WHERE WE EAT WEL

 
The traditional idea of Lithuanian food is associated with humble imagery and a low profile. We do not dazzle or stupefy. And yet we have things to offer.
There are two things that Lithuanians like to show off.
The first one is a bizarre-looking cold pink soup made of beetroots. Lithuanians are one of the nations that claim the title and the honour of the original borsch soup, but this is different. In summer, there is little more refreshing than a cold bowl of this product.
The second dish is called cepelinai. These are huge potato dumplings – more like fist-sized torpedoes, really – made in the form of early XX century airships, Zeppelins, and just as deadly. The potato dough is stuffed with a pork meatball the size of a golf ball, and then they are boiled and served with cold soured cream and a garnish of cubed fried bacon.
These are not a type of light food in anyone’s book. In fact, this is some of the heaviest food on Earth, and yet it can be wdevilishly addictive.
A good choice of something peculiarly local and yet not terribly filling would be forest mushrooms. We are incredibly serious about our mushrooms: an average Lithuanian would know not one, not two but at least ten various kinds of forest mushrooms.
THIS IS SOME OF THE HEAVIEST FOOD ON EARTH, AND YET IT CAN BE DEVILISHLY ADDICTIVE.